Peter Gets it Right

Mark 8:27-30

Parallel Texts: Matthew 16:13-20; Luke 9:18-21

After Jesus restores sight to a blind man in 8:22-26, Mark cuts to a new scene.  Jesus and the disciples are walking toward  Caesarea Philippi, and along the way Jesus asks them who people say that He is.’ They replied, “Some say John the Baptist; others say Elijah; and still others, one of the prophets.”’ (v. 28) Then Jesus drops the big question:

“But what about you?” he asked. “Who do you say I am?”

Peter answered, “You are the Messiah.”

Mark 8:29

Matthew has it this way:

Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”

Matthew 16:16

Some refer to this as “The Great Confession” for it is upon this confession that the church stands.  As Matthew makes clear in 16:17-20, not only does the church stand upon this foundation, but also our hope of overcoming death itself rests here, for it is only through the belief that Jesus is indeed the Messiah, the Son of the Living God that that anyone will receive eternal life.

Sadly, there is much controversy on this passage, but I must remind myself that we are studying Mark, not Matthew! Suffice it say that the rock is the acknowledgement of the truth of Jesus’ identity  and not the poor vessel who first stated it, for in the very next section, Peter will demonstrate his lack of understanding of the totality of what he has said!

Mark finishes this part of the scene by simply stating that Jesus warned the disciples not to tell anyone about this. He does not give a reason for this warning. Maybe we should wait and see if anything will shed light on this as Mark continues.

You might be detecting a subtle shift in Mark’s tone, for while his presentation remains choppy with short scenes moving quickly along, from this point, the tone of Mark’s writing will become more and more serious. He has already begun to provide us with more details more often, and that trend will continue, and though he never provides the amount of in-depth coverage that Matthew and John will provide in parallel texts, Mark will be filling in more details from here on out than he has previously about certain things.

Well, Peter has attained a spiritual high in this text, being the first to say who Jesus is, let’s see if he can stay on that high plane in the next section.

Advertisements

About Don Merritt

A long time teacher and writer, Don hopes to share his varied life's experiences in a different way with a Christian perspective.
This entry was posted in Bible and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Peter Gets it Right

  1. Peter was impulsive both to the good and the not so good., (It’s one of the symptoms of ADHD, along with inattentiveness and hyperactivity. Uhmm. Could it be?)

    I can see where this is going, and I think it’s a great theme. Peter got out of the boat, walked a few steps on the water to reach Jesus, his faith faltered and Jesus lifted him up. That, in a nutshell was Peter. He won great victories and endured cruel defeats, but isn’t that us also?

    I’m so glad the gospel writers were honest enough to write about Peter’s many peccadilloes. His flawed humanity revealed the amazing grace and love of Jesus to lift him up again and again.It gives me hope.

    Like Peter, I need to be forgiven and lifted back up daily. Even in his apostolic days he was up to the same stuff. One moment he’s swaying the Jerusalem council to accept Gentiles as co-heirs of grace, the next he is pressured into excluding them, sitting at table with those who rejected the Jerusalem edict. Oh, and he was soundly rebuked by Paul for it who also had his ups and downs.

    Wade

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s